Record Overplayed
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Easyworld | CD review | 2004

EASYWORLD - Kill The Last Romantic (02/02/04 - Jive)

Review by Dawn

If there's any justice in the music world, 2004 will be the year in which Eastbourne's three most talented residents finally achieve the success and recognition they so richly deserve. A Top 30 placing for recent single Til the Day - their highest chart position to date - would certainly seem to suggest that, at last, their relentless touring is beginning to pay off and perhaps those fans who threatened to turn their backs on the band's new downbeat sound may just be tempted to cast one final glance in Easyworld's direction.

The day that Dav Ford becomes blissfully happy will, in Easyworld terms at least, effectively become the day the music dies. While (full) debut LP This Is Where I Stand served the band well with its brash and bouncy anthems such as the glorious Bleach, the trio's path now appears to lead directly to all things a little more mellow and maudlin. That's not to say that Kill The Last Romantic comprises purely doom and gloom - the R.E.M-esque All I Can Remember and irresistible live favourite Celebritykiller offer a brief return to the rockier days of yore - but let's face it; when it comes to using nothing but a few emotive chords and well-chosen turns of phrase, no-one can shatter hearts quite like Dav Ford. And while This Is Where I Stand showed a hell of a lot of promise, Mr Ford has now had sufficient time in the business to hone his heartbreaking craft to perfection - a talent never demonstrated better than here on Saddest Song and heart-achingly beautiful piano ballad Tonight.

But far from being an album overflowing with misery, Easyworld's admirable old 'there's better ways to self destruct' philosophy and 'you-and-me against the bastards' sentiments shine through more clearly than ever here in Goodnight, A Lot of Miles From Home and the aforementioned Til the Day - songs which are all as wonderfully optimistic as old favourites such as Demons. Dav's strengths as a lyricist (albeit an often cynical one) were showcased in the album's first single release, 2nd Amendment, and in particular When You Come Back I Won't Be Here and the haunting Drive also demonstrate beautifully his refusal to write to order or follow the tired old songwriter path of cliche-ridden lyrics.

Rest assured; eventually Mr Ford will find his soulmate, complete contentment and the life he's always dreamed of. But for the sake of music, let's be selfish and hope that it doesn't happen anytime soon. Not while he's still writing such exquisite songs as these.

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